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Posts Tagged ‘amazon

Engineer and Son from Rochester, Minnesota Explore the Peruvian Amazon and Machu Picchu

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limaThe Post Bulletin paper from Rochester, Minnesota, recently published a travel article written by engineer April Horne who decided to travel to Peru with her eight-grade student son Garrison Komanieckiand.

The destinations within Peru included Machu Picchu, one of the “New Seven Wonders of the World”, and the Amazon River/Rainforest, which is currently ranked No. 3 in the voting for Natural Wonders of the World.

While at Lima (where the major international airport is located), they explored the city and said:

“We walked through beautiful cathedrals, including one with extensive catacomb structures, an engineering marvel that had survived numerous severe earthquakes. We also saw pre-Incan ruins dating back to about 600 A.D.”

While in the Amazon, she highlights:

“We learned how to shoot a blow gun and danced around a fire with the villagers. We were struck by the simple life of the villagers, with minimal possessions, open-air huts and a diet consisting of fish, bananas and the occasional sloth or monkey. We ended our rainforest stay with a “recovery” stop at Ceiba Tops, a luxury resort with hot and cold running water and a swimming pool.

And on her trip to Machu Picchu, she says:

Our guide told us about the different sections of the Lost City, pointing out agricultural areas and living quarters, temples, channels for drinking water and waste water. He showed us how structures were built to study the stars and movements of the sun. We finished with a hike up a portion of the Incan Trail to the Sun Gate.

Click here to read the full article.

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Written by Catherine Castro

January 30, 2009 at 9:15 am

Peruvian Amazon Women Handcrafted Baskets in San Diego and Chicago Museums and Zoo

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amazon1Ever wondered how you can support the native poor women from the Peruvian Amazon from the U.S.?

The New York Times wrote an article about how women from a remote Amazon village weave baskets as a way of living to export them to the US.

As the article states, their first international buyers are the San Diego Natural History Museum and San Diego Zoo, and they plan to sell to other museums and home décor purveyors like the Field Museum in Chicago and eventually Cost Plus.

What is unique about their weaving ability is that they use fibers from the branch of the chambira palm tree and turn them into anything they need — fishing nets, hammocks, purses, skirts and dental floss.

And here is what Nancy Stevens, manager of retail and wholesale operations for the San Diego Natural History Museum, states when talking about selling Peruvian handicrafts to retailers in the US:

“These baskets represent so much more than simply a basket. When I began to hear their story from a local project into a story of sustainability, where they’re being developed as a responsible use of the natural resources of this Amazon region — it just clicked so beautifully with the mission of this museum.”

To read the full article, click here.

Written by Catherine Castro

January 23, 2009 at 11:52 pm

Physician from Wisconsin Brings Health Services to Peruvians in Amazon Since 1990

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smithIt is so inspiring when I read stories on experiences foreigners have when they visit Peru but end up actually moving over there captured by its culture, its forest, its food, or any other of its wonders. This is similar to the story from my earlier post on a man from Arkansas who after his trip to the Peruvian Amazon ended up changing his life to take the job of his dreams: become a canoe guide on the Mississippi River.

Click here to read this story I found in a Wisconsin local newspaper The Eagle on Dr. Linnea Smith, a medical practitioner from Wisconsin who ends up leaving her family medical practice in Prairie du Sac to take her doctoring deep in the Amazon rainforest in Peru, and thought to share it with you all.

The story is about how in an adventure of finding out where her plants came from, Dr. Smith decided to travel to Peru’s Amazon where she has lived since 1990. She serves thousands of residents, both children and adult, in very remote areas.

As the story reports, in 1998 she published a book on her experiences titled “La Doctora.” In 2005, the Wisconsin Medical Society chose Smith as the Wisconsin Physician Citizen of the Year. And this fall, she received a Distinguished Alumni Award from the Wisconsin Alumni Association, which takes trips that visit her clinic in Peru.

Take a read, and let me know what you think. Captivating story — and thankful to her for bringing so much love and health support to those kids and their parents who have very limited access to hospital care.

Written by Catherine Castro

December 20, 2008 at 1:27 am

Staying Green: Peru’s Commitment to Global Environmental Sustainability

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forestIn the search for global environmental sustainability, Peru is a key player in protection of tropical forests. In fact, Peru has the fourth largest area of tropical forest in the world after Brazil, Democratic Republic of Congo and Indonesia.

As a BBC Latin America news article states, the Peruvian government has committed to US$ 5 million a year in its fight to preserve climate change via the presevation of its tropical forests. The government has calculated that Peru needs about US$ 25 million a year for the next 10 years to be able to save or conserve initially at least 54 million hectares of forest, which could rise to 60 million.

So on your next trip to Peru, a wonderful diversity of tropical forests awaits you. But please be mindful of the need to preserve them in a clean and safe way to ensure we provide the best this world can offer to our future generations.

Written by Catherine Castro

December 8, 2008 at 12:08 am

How an Arkansas Man’s Life Changed After His Trip to the Peruvian Amazon

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Tremblay with an anaconda snake in the Amazon

Tremblay with an anaconda snake in the Amazon

I came across this interesting story on how a trip to Peru and other South American countries can change your life for the better. If you are of the adventure type, this is a must read.

After leaving his girlfriend behind, quiting his job, and stuck with non-refundable tickets and other travel expenses, Arkansas resident Marc Tremblay made the best of this travel which turned out to change his life to take the job of his dreams: become a canoe guide on the Mississippi River.

Perhaps you won’t change your job, or perhaps you will get to travel with your significant other. But the one thing that will remain similar to Marc’s story about yours is it will become an eye opening adventure.

To read Marc’s story published in the Reader Travelogue section of Commercial Appeal, click here.

Written by Catherine Castro

December 6, 2008 at 5:39 pm

Lost City More Than 1,000 Years Old Found in the Jungle of Northern Peru’s Amazon

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chachapoyas-peru-4_1126226cA city has been found in the northern jungle area of Peru’s Amazon dated more than 1,000 years old belonging to the ancient Chachapoya tribe, as UK newspaper The Telegraph reports.

This tribe is said to have been beaten into submission by the mighty Incas in 1475, and eventually wiped out by small pox and other diseases brought by the Europeans.

The discovery also includes very-well kept ancient ceramics and undisturbed burial sites.

Written by Catherine Castro

December 4, 2008 at 12:36 am

Possible Ancient Pre-Incan City Found in Peru’s Amazon

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Citizens in the north East of Peru In Utcubamba, Amazonas are said to have found a pre-Incan city including also two caverns with ancient ceramics, according to local press El Comercio. Local government representatives will be visiting the site in the following days. The regional government in Amazonas is requesting for the implementation of a tourism circuit in the area given it is also nearby the Lejía falls.

Written by Catherine Castro

November 29, 2008 at 1:39 pm