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Cherry Piscotini, Recipe Exclusively From Las Canteras Restaurant

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Cherry Piscotini by Las Canteras (Washington, DC)

Washington-DC based Las Canteras co-owner Gary Lee shares with us another one of his innovative pisco-based drink recipes exclusively with “Connect to Peru” in celebration of “Pisco Day”.

So here is the recipe, and hope you have fun trying it at home!

Cherry Piscotini
Ingredients (1 serving): Two and a half ounces of cherry-infused Pisco, one half ounce of blackberry schnapps, a half ounce of cherry juice, juice from 1/2 lime, a splash of soda, a scoop of ice.

To make the drink, mix all of the ingredients in a cocktail shaker and shake well until nicely chilled. Serve in a chilled martini glass.

Optional decoration: sugar around the rim of the glass.Garnish with a cherry.

Enjoy!

Written by Catherine Castro

February 8, 2009 at 10:49 pm

Where to get Inca Kola in New England and in the Washington DC area?

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incaInca Kola is the Peruvian local soft drink (soda) and is also named “the Golden Kola”. It gets its yellow color from Hierba Luisa (Lemon Verbena in English), a natural ancestral herb. The uniqueness of the story behind it is that Peru is perhaps the only country in which a local soda beats Coca Cola and Pepsi in market share  – a case study that Harvard’s Business School has covered for more than a decade.

Some like it, some don’t mainly for its sweetness. But if you are in the first group, or you’d like to try it, you can get it in the International aisle of most (if not all) of the Stop and Shop grocery stores in New England (Boston, Connecticut, Rhode Island, etc.). It is available in 2 liter plastic bottles, and some stores carry smaller sizes of bottles and/or aluminium cans.

And if you are in the Greater Washington DC area (DC, MD, VA), you can get Inca Kola at the Giant stores in their International aisle.

If you’d like to read further about Inca Kola, a good place to read is at its Wikipedia entry by clicking here.

Want to share where you get Inca Kola at your local city? Post it in the comments section to share it with the world!

Written by Catherine Castro

January 4, 2009 at 10:44 pm

Merry Christmas a la Peruvian, by Las Canteras’ Executive Chef Eddy Ancasi

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eddy-ancasiLocated in the Dupont Circle/Adams Morgan area, Las Canteras Restaurant & Bar is one of Washington DC’s Peruvian food hot spots where you can get several authentic dishes and of course Pisco Sours. For today’s Christmas post, its executive chef Eddy Ancasi – a native Peruvian from Arequipa, a department located in the South West of Peru – is our special guest!

A typical Peruvian Christmas starts with a big dinner on the 24th with a table full of dishes similar to Americans’ Thanksgiving dinner. Turkey is the typical main dish, although lately there have been variations of pork or chicken; side dishes include potatoes or white rice; as well as traditional homemade hot chocolate, and paneton (an Italian sweet bread). At midnight, everyone hugs and grabs their presents from underneath the Christmas tree and opens them, while fireworks start going on everywhere. After a few hours of kids enjoying their presents, everyone goes to sleep after much chit chat. The next morning, the family gathers again for lunch to eat leftovers or they all go to a nice family restaurant and continue the celebration. If you are married, having a two-day celebration gives you the chance to spend at each other’s families.

And, here is how chef Eddy Ancasi remembers his own Christmas family gatherings:

Over the years, the celebration of Christmas has evolved. In my childhood — in the mountain town of Chuchibamba — Christmas was a mostly Catholic affair. It centered around singing — carols and folk holiday songs called villancicos. And there was always hot beverages made from dark Peruvian chocolate and paneton. Later, when I moved to Arequipa, Christmas eve was a time of family reunion. All my relatives gathered around a long table laden with turkey, mashed potatoes and different kinds of salads — Russian salad, potato salad and so on. Still later, when I moved to the Washington D.C. area, Christmas became a time for gift giving, seeing friends, and of course, gorging on “Causa de Pollo” and other classic Peruvian dishes.

I guess to nobody’s surprise Peruvian food is the main guest of the party regardless of where in Peru you are from. No wonder the expression “love grows through the stomach”.

Have a wonderful Christmas Day!

Written by Catherine Castro

December 25, 2008 at 12:48 pm