Connect to Peru

Where Americans and Peruvians Living Abroad Connect to Peru

Posts Tagged ‘drinks

The Origins of the Pisco

leave a comment »

piscoInstead of writing a post about pisco and its origins, here is a two-part video named “Pisco, cultural heritage of Peru” that walks you through the origins of pisco, including locations where it is produced in the south coast of Peru, official documents from centuries ago proving pisco is authentic from Peru (and nowhere else — others claimed to be pisco are really a totally different liqueur not 100% from grapes — a key characteristic of the authentic pisco), as well as interesting recipes you can make with pisco. You might also want to take note of the locations mentioned in this video which are great places where you can visit and see how pisco is produced.

Part 1

  • The history
  • The old cellars
  • The name
  • Pisco tourism

Part 2

  • Bar and Kitchen — includes commentary from Peruvian top chefs Isabel Alvarez, Gaston Acurio and Pedro Schiaffino
  • Cultural Heritage

Written by Catherine Castro

February 8, 2009 at 9:21 am

Where to Celebrate “Pisco Day” in the U.S., by Macchu Pisco CEO and Owner Melanie Asher

leave a comment »

melanie3Our friend and owner of Macchu Pisco Melanie Asher provides a list of the hottest places in the main U.S. cities to celebrate “Pisco Day” this weekend. Here is the list and a link to their websites to get more information!

In New York: PDT (113 St. Marks Pl., in the East Village) or Yerba Buena (23 Avenue A)

In Washington, DC: The Gibson (2009 14th St. NW, in the U Street area), Bar Pilar (1833 14th St NW, in the U Street area) or Las Canteras (in Adams Morgan)

In Virginia: PX Lounge (in Alexandria) or The Majestic (in Alexandria)

In Maryland: Aroma (in Olney)

In Boston: The Four Seasons (200 Boylston Street) and Eastern Standard (528 Commonwealth Ave)

In Las Vegas: Sushi Samba (3325 Las Vegas Blvd. South)

And, to this list I’d also add:

In Boston: Taranta (North End) and Orinoco (22 Harvard Street in Brookline, or 477 Shawmut Avenue in downtown).

Happy Pisco Day, and thanks to Melanie for sharing these tips with Macchu Pisco fans!

Written by Catherine Castro

February 7, 2009 at 2:15 pm

So…what’s Pisco? Here’s the 101.

leave a comment »

piscoPisco is the Peruvian grape “aguardiente” obtained from the distillation of recently fermented musts exclusively grapes (grape juice). It has been produced since the 16th century on the mid-south coast of Peru, including the departments of Lima, Ica, Arequipa, Moquegua, and Tacna.

Lexicographers, chroniclers and historians state the word “pisco” comes from the pre-Hispanic Quechua word “pisko” meaning “bird” as the Incas were captivated by the huge number and diversity of birds in this coastal region.

There are two groups of grapes for producing the pisco:

  • Aromatic grapes: Albilla, Italia, Muscatel (Moscatel) and Torontel
  • Non-aromatic grapes: Mollar, Black (Negra Corriente), Quebranta and Uvina

According to the Peruvian Ministry of Production’s Technical Norms, these are the types of pisco you can get from these grapes:

  • Pure (Puro): From Quebranta, Mollar or Black grapes
  • Aromatic (Aromatico): From Muscatel grapes
  • Green Mosto (Mosto Verde): From the distillation of grape musts in fermentation process (this refers to the musts in which sugar has not been transformed into alcohol)
  • Blended (Acholado): From the distillation of musts of different grape varieties

And now you wonder which one of these grapes and types of piscos is best for the pisco sour?!?!? Well, the most preferred is the Pure type of pisco from Quebranta grapes. There are other drinks you can make with pisco, such as Chilcano, Pisco Libre, Fruit Cocktail, Captain, Bible, Pisco Sunrise, among many others.

Even President Bush and global world leaders got a kick out of the Peruvian pisco sour!

Stay tuned for some easy-to-make recipes coming up soon!

Written by Catherine Castro

November 30, 2008 at 11:43 pm