Connect to Peru

Where Americans and Peruvians Living Abroad Connect to Peru

Posts Tagged ‘incas

Newest Pre-Incan Museum “Huaca Rajada” Opens Nearby Lord of Sipan’s Tomb in Lambayeque, Peru

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top_lambayequeIn the northern department of Lambayeque, the newest display of Peruvian archeology just opened in a museum named “Huaca Rajada”, as Reuters reports. The museum showcases masks, ceramics and jewelry from the ancient Moche culture (prior to the Inca empire) which flourished on Peru’s coast from about 100 AD to 600 AD. Click here to watch a video with images on what you can find on your visit. And at the museum, there is an area where locals manufacture native-styled textiles for sale to visitors as souvenirs.

It is worth noting that the museum is located very close to the golden tomb of the Lord of Sipan — dubbed the “Tutankhamen of the Americas”.

These two sites – the new museum and the tomb – could be two great stops for your next trip to Peru if you are of the exploration, archaeology, or historian type. Once you get to the capital city Lima via its international airport, you can take a bus or fly to Lambayeque.

Here is a good site where you can get further information about where to go and what to do in Lambayeque.

And click here to watch a great video to learn who was the Lord of Sipan and why it is so important not only for Peruvian history, but also why it is treasured by historians from around the world.

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Written by Catherine Castro

January 29, 2009 at 9:09 am

Discovering ‘Lost’ Kingdom of the Ancient Inca

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machu-picchuThis is the title of the travel article in today’s Miami Herald. It includes a pretty good summary on the most recent developments behind the stories on how the Machu Picchu citadel was “lost” and rediscovered.

The article states:

For decades, the story has been that Yale professor Hiram Bingham, in a feat that smacks of Indiana Jones, ”discovered” Machu Picchu and its treasure in 1911. In fact, according to Beto Rengifo Solano, one of Peru’s leading archaeological guides, Bingham was led to the site by a barefoot, young boy. When he got there, four families were living among these grandest of Incan ruins. Its greatest treasure had long since been plundered.

A recent article in The New York Times goes one step further, reporting the existence of property records that show repeated purchases and sale of lands including Machu Picchu before 1911, and suggesting the possibility that a German logger may have made off with the site’s best treasures. Other early visitors may well have included a British missionary and a German businessman.

Click here to read the full article. The debate about being lost and its discovery might take decades, but as the article states Machu Picchu “itself remains an endless enchantment.”

Written by Catherine Castro

January 18, 2009 at 6:49 pm

Cajamarca To Become Peru’s Carnival Capital in 2009

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cajamarcaCajamarca is one of the 24 departments of Peru located in the far north Highlands region (see my earlier post to get a map). In order to promote it as a tourist attraction all throughout the country and around the world, the local government will be registering Cajamarca to be known as “Peru’s Carnival Capital” to the National Institute for the Defense of Competition and Protection of Intellectual Property (Indecopi).

As Andina reports,

One of the most important carnival celebrations is the Cajamarca Carnival, considered one of the country’s most famous festivals during February and March. During the carnival, locals from different parts of the region compete with other neighborhoods in a dance and music contest. Afterward, a parade is organized where all can enjoy the festive music and dances. This celebration lasts for one month with eight main days.

For those who have gone to the Brazilian Carnival, Cajamarca’s carnivals aren’t as big or crazy of a party. Very differently, they are traditionalist and a place where you can enjoy the colorful folkloric dresses and dances that have gone through several generations in history. And most likely, there will be great traditional dishes sold at stands and restaurants nearby.

It is a great target if you are planning to visit Peru between February and March 2009! And if you have several days of stay in Peru, you might want to enjoy a trip driving from Lima to Cajamarca which takes 12-13 hours, but worth making stops along the way to enjoy the local dishes and archaeological sites. And if you don’t have too much time, you can also catch a flight from Lima.

Here is a good video where you can get a glance of the drive from Lima to Cajamarca. You can also watch Cajamarca’s main square, archaeological sites, as well as the “Banos del Inca” which are the saunas used back at the time of the Inca empire as spiritual purifiers for the royalty.

And here is a good map of an illustration of Cajamarca’s tourism sites nearby.

Written by Catherine Castro

December 23, 2008 at 10:55 pm

Lost City More Than 1,000 Years Old Found in the Jungle of Northern Peru’s Amazon

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chachapoyas-peru-4_1126226cA city has been found in the northern jungle area of Peru’s Amazon dated more than 1,000 years old belonging to the ancient Chachapoya tribe, as UK newspaper The Telegraph reports.

This tribe is said to have been beaten into submission by the mighty Incas in 1475, and eventually wiped out by small pox and other diseases brought by the Europeans.

The discovery also includes very-well kept ancient ceramics and undisturbed burial sites.

Written by Catherine Castro

December 4, 2008 at 12:36 am