Connect to Peru

Where Americans and Peruvians Living Abroad Connect to Peru

Posts Tagged ‘lemon

Pisco Sour: The Perfect Family- and Friends-Gathering Companion for this Holiday Season

leave a comment »

pisco-sour-imageSo now that you know what “pisco” is (if not, you can read my earlier post), and with the upcoming Holiday season and surely many family and friends gatherings, here is a great way how to keep your guests entertained with some good Peruvian pisco sour!

This recipe comes from a site recommended by my friend Renzo Palacios, a contributor on matters of pisco for my blog. In this English site, you can get a lot of the basic information by clicking the yellow icons on the bottom, including: what is pisco, how it is made, the fine crystal glass designed by the Austrian house Riedel with an ideal form to correctly appreciate its taste best, how to recognize a good pisco, etc.

So here is an easy-to-make recipe pulled from this site, with some tips when preparing it:

  • 3 oz. pure pisco
  • 1 oz. lemon juice
  • 1 oz sugar syrup
  • 1 egg white
  • ice cubes (just a few enough to cool it)
  • angostura bitter

In a blender, mix the egg white and lemon juice. Add the sugar syrup, the ice cubes, and pisco. Mix again. Pour into a cocktail glass or champagne flute, and add drops of angostura bitter on top in the middle.

And here are some TIPS:

  • The secret of a good tasting pisco sour (besides using a good pisco) is the shaking of its egg whites. The more air the egg whites get when shaking, the better it will taste. That’s why many people prefer preparing it on a cocktail shaker instead of a blender.
  • Here are some fine old-renowned pisco brands you might want to try asking at your local specialty liqueur store: Ocucaje, Santiago Queirolo, or Tacama. The best type for pisco sours is the pisco coming from Quebranta grapes (read label). If you don’t find it, you can try any other brand out there, but make sure you get a Peruvian-made brand to get good quality results – and get the real pisco, not a different type of grape-made liqueur.
  • The angostura bitter will come in a bottle similar to wine or smaller. The liquid is browned-colored. You might be able to find it at a specialty liqueur store. All you will need is 2-3 drops of it in the middle of the pisco sour at the end (I personally prefer just the bitter versus adding also the cinnamon).
  • Don’t try using regular or powdered sugar instead of the sugar syrup. You will get a totally different taste.
  • Don’t replace lemon for lime. The taste of the pisco sour is great when you bring the acidity of the lemon into the mix.

If you don’t know where to get pisco or angostura bitter, you might want to check out a specialty liqueur store in your city. In the Washington DC area, I love buying my supplies at the Wine Specialist located at 2115 M Street NW (www.winespecialist.com). You can order the angostura bitter if they don’t have it on stock.

There are several ways to make a pisco sour (some change the proportions), but this one I found to be the easiest one to make.

Pisco Sour is not the only drink you can make from pisco. So make sure you stock up on those precious pisco bottles and stay tuned for more pisco-based recipes later on!

Let me know how you did! It will be a great way to rehearse for the upcoming “Pisco Sour Day” in early February!

Salud!

Written by Catherine Castro

December 22, 2008 at 12:49 pm

Peru In Search of Another Guinness Record: The Largest Ceviche in the World

leave a comment »

ceviche2This Sunday December 7, more than 450 chefs in Lima, Peru will convene to prepare the world’s largest ceviche in the world and look to gain its leadership back from 2004 as Peru’s largest newspaper El Comercio reports.

Ingredients will include 5 tons of fish, 3 tons of lemon, 2 1/2 tons of onion, 440 lbs. of salt and 440 lbs. of Peruvian chilli.

In 2004, Peru won the Guinness world record after preparing 9,127 lbs. of ceviche.

Ceviche is one of Peru’s cuisine flagship dishes largely known around the world — and please make sure restaurants serve you on a plate like this, not a glass (!) and with large-sized corn, and sweet potato on the side. That’s a good tip to keep in mind to make sure you are eating a real ceviche! Bon apetit.

Written by Catherine Castro

December 2, 2008 at 4:17 pm